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Below are all of the courses you have to choose from in this academic major. Some are required while others are electives. Please view the course catalog to see what is required to earn a degree in this major.


Practicum:Secondary (SED 301)

This is a field experience for those pursuing secondary certification. Students work in area school classrooms one day per week per term. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Formal admission into the Education Program required. Co-requisite: SED335 and SED432. Pass/Fail only. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit. Repeatable for credit.

1 Credit.

Practicum:Secondary Methods (SED 304)

This is a companion course for all secondary methods courses. In this early field experience, pre-service students work with secondary content specialist teachers in area schools for one day per week per term. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Formal admission into the Education Program required. Corequisite: SED222, SED314, SED319, SED320, or SED323. Pass/Fail only. Fall semester, even-numbered years. 1 credit. Repeatable for credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Practicum:Multiculturalism (SED 305)

A pre-service 15 hour practicum experience for students in districts that have a diverse (ethnically, racially, and economically) student body. Students observe, tutor, and co-teach in a diverse environment. This course is required for candidates in all certification areas. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Formal admission into the Education Program required or permission of instructor. Prerequisite: SED201 or SED202. Pass/Fail only. Repeatable for credit. Fall and spring semesters, J-term and M-term travel abroad. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Student Teaching (SED 434)

This is a 14-week student teaching experience for students who are earning a single area of certification. Students are expected to plan and employ lesson designs based on Pennsylvania Core Standards under the guidance of a cooperating teacher in an area school. Transportation is the student’s responsibility. Students are assigned to schools within a 20-mile radius of the University. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Prerequisites: Completion of all courses required for certification; “B-” or better in SED201 or SED202, and SED432; cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better; passing scores on Basic Skills Assessment; and approval of Education faculty. Corequisite: SED435 for all; SED436 is also a corequisite for PreK-4 majors. Permission required. Fall and spring semesters. 12 credits. Fee.

12 Credits.

Introduction to English Studies (SEL 150)

Introduces the study of English with a focus on foundational skills for college and career. Emphasis on literary forms, close reading, analysis, and the research process. Practice in writing the literary essay and other genres. Discussion of careers for English majors and minors. English majors take this course during their first semester. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Topics in Literature (SEL 151)

Offers specialized study of a particular genre, time period, theme, region, author, or other literary/cultural phenomenon. Counts toward the gender and women's studies minor when the topic is "Feminist Readings." Repeatable for credit. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Introduction to Creative Writing (SEL 153)

Introduces, through readings and writing exercises, the novel, poetry, drama, screenplays, genre fiction, and creative non-fiction. Spring semester, odd numbered years. Satisfies the Artistic Expression requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. 3 credits. Fee.

Writing Popular Fiction (SEL 155)

Introduction to the reading and writing of popular fiction. Emphasis on understanding the scope and meaning of the conventions of the major genres: romance, mystery, science fiction, fantasy, horror, young adult, etc. Practice in writing popular fiction. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Career Orientation (SEL 156)

Sophomore-level career workshop for English majors and minors with a focus on setting individualized goals and starting the career journey well before graduation. Every student creates an individualized career plan that charts a course for years 2, 3, and 4 at Seton Hill, possibly including courses to take, minors or second majors, summer, part-time, and work-study jobs, initial internship plans, beginning a publication program. Pre-requisite: SEL150. Spring semester. 1 credit.

News, Arts, and Sports Writing (SEL 160)

Exploration of the meticulously sourced style of informative writing practiced by professional journalists, emphasizing news, arts/entertainment and sports reporting. By reporting on local & current events students will also explore cultural issues such as racial and gender bias and the function journalism plays in a free society. Repeatable for credit. Fall semester. 3 credits. Fee.

Linguistics: Culture and Literacy (SEL 220)

Studies language as a dynamic, evolving tool situated in cultural practice. Applies fundamental concepts of linguistics including syntax, phonology, morphology, and pragmatics to contemporary issues of literacy and learning. Topics include how language is acquired, how and why languages change over time, how technology and language influence one another, and how English functions as a language. Spring semester, odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

Topics in Creative Writing (SEL 231)

Emphasis varies from term to term, e.g., Starting Your Novel, Digital Storytelling, Creative Non-Fiction, Flash Fiction. Offered Summer online and as needed. Repeatable for credit. Satisfies the Artistic Expression requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. 3 credits.

Writing Fiction (SEL 232)

Instruction and practice in the writing of short fiction. Prerequisite: SEL106 or SEL107. Fall semester, odd-numbered years. Satisfies the Artistic Expression requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. 3 credits.

Writing Poetry (SEL 233)

Instruction and practice in the writing of poetry. Consideration of contemporary poetic theory and practice. Fall semester, odd-numbered years. Satisfies the Artistic Expression requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. 3 credits.

Magazine Writing and Editing (SEL 235)

Students develop skills in advanced nonfiction writing by crafting texts in several common magazine genres and practicing the writing process. Topics include the role of audience and publication analysis, an introduction to various common genres of magazine writing, strategies research in magazine writing, the ethics of magazine writing, an introduction to the process of publication and editing, and the impact of technology on the magazine industry. Satisfies the Artistic Expression requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Spring semester, even-numbered years. 3 credits.

Writing about Literature (SEL 237)

This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of English, with particular emphasis in the researched essay. Students read a wide variety of primary texts and interpret them through writing, revision, and literary theory. English and journalism majors should take this course in the fall semester of the sophomore year. Writing Intensive course. Fall semester. Prerequisites: SEL106 or SEL107, and SEL150, grade of C or better. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

The Bible as Literature (SEL 255)

This is an introductory literature course in reading the Bible. The course surveys the formation of the Bible related to Judaic and Christian traditions. Students examine diverse literary forms: from mythic stories of origin and prophecies to poems and parables. Students develop the skill of critically reading biblical literature through a theological lens. Spring semester, even-numbered years. Satisfies the Theology requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. 3 credits.

Career Exploration (SEL 256)

Junior-level career workshop revisiting, updating, and enacting the individualized career plan created in Career Orientation. Focus on assessing and changing goals, making concrete, achievable plans, and taking action steps, such as applying for jobs and internships, content creation, and publication. Each student creates or revises a resume targeted toward internships and summer employment. Students apply for at least three internships or summer jobs related to career goals. Continued work on English portfolio. Pre-requisite: SEL156. Spring semester. 1 credit.

Topics in World Literature (SEL 263)

Topics vary from year to year, e.g., International Novel, Confucius and Modern Thought, African Women’s Writing, Survey of World Literature. Spring semester, even-numbered years. Repeatable for credit. Satisfies the Global Perspectives requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. 3 credits.

Shakespeare in Context (SEL 264)

The works of significant British writers from the Anglo-Saxon period to the 18th century, but with special emphasis on Shakespeare and how his works fit into the development of British literature. Fall semester, odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

British Voices from Romantics - Now (SEL 265)

The works of significant British writers from the Romantic Period till today, with emphasis on the historical and cultural development of British literature. Spring semester, even-numbered years. 3 credits.

American Lit Survey, 1776 to Pres (SEL 266)

Surveys a broad expanse of American literature, including fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction, written in different regions of the United States, by men and women of various cultural groups. Canonical works and movements are studied along with writing from marginalized or emerging viewpoints, such as Native American oral tradition, African American narrative, women's private and public writing, and multimodal storytelling. Prerequisite: SEL106 or SEL107. Fall semester. Satisfies the U.S. Cultures requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. 3 credits.

Topics: New Voices (SEL 268)

In this course students will be introduced to the work of a diverse range of writers who because of political and cultural histories of inequality have been marginalized from the literary establishment. The topics and texts will vary and come from diverse literary traditions and genres, calling students to analyze texts in relation to their cultural/historical contexts. Repeatable for credit. Fall semester, odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

Cont American Lit for Children (SEL 269)

Introduction to novels and picture books for elementary school-aged children, with emphasis on presenting such books in the classroom, encouraging a love of reading, and addressing geographic, cultural, and socioeconomic differences through books. Fulfills literature requirement for teaching certification candidates. Fall semester. Satisfies the U.S. Cultures requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. 3 credits.

European Literature I (SEL 271)

A survey of selected European writers (non-British) from ancient times to 1750, and of how, through literature, they express their understanding of human experience. Counts toward the Western Cultures requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester, even-numbered years. 3 credits.

European Literature II (SEL 272)

A survey of selected European writers (non-British) from the Enlightenment to the present, and of how, through literature, they express their understanding of human experience. Counts toward the Western Cultures requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Spring semester, odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

Topics in American Literature (SEL 273)

Explores a major author, genre or theme in American literature, providing in-depth study of the chosen topic. Offerings might include topics such as Broadway Musicals as Literature, Poe and a Popular Fiction Innovator, Individualism and Communities in American Poetry, or Cyborg Bodies in American Literature. Repeatable for credit. Pre-requisite: SEL106 or SEL107. Satisfies the U.S. Cultures requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Special Topics In English (SEL 309)

Topics vary from term to term; emphasis is on upper-level (junior and senior) in-depth study, e.g., Southern Women Writers, The Vampire in Literature, Literature of the Sea, Digital Storytelling, The Sublime, Avant Garde Cinema, Contemporary Irish Literature, Remixes. Prerequisites: SEL150 and two other English courses. Spring semesters. Repeatable for credit. 3 credits.

Literary Criticism (SEL 312)

A study of diverse literary theories, emphasizing the practical application of criticism through deep textual analysis. Students will perform critical writing informed by advanced schools of thought, contemporary cultural issues and significant methods of literary research. Prerequisite: SEL237. Fall semester, even-numbered years. 3 credits.

Creative Content (SEL 335)

Students critique as well as compose their own creative, multimodal texts (texts that combine writing with other modalities such as images, sounds, movement, etc.) in digital environments. Principles from rhetorical theory including audience, purpose, ethos, and other rhetorical devices (metaphor, juxtaposition, etc.) are applied in the analysis and composition of multimodal texts. Sophomore status required. Repeatable for credit. Fall semester, even-numbered years. 3 credits.

Literature for Young Adults (SEL 344)

An introduction to literature targeted toward middle and high school readers. Includes poetry and short fiction; emphasizes novel-length fiction from Catcher in the Rye to contemporary fantasy. Includes teaching strategies, principles of selection, and special concerns of those writing adolescent literature. Spring semester, odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

Career Capstone (SEL 356)

Senior level workshop focusing on finding employment in an English-related field. Students apply for jobs, fill out graduate school applications, and/or submit to appropriate publications, enacting the career plans made in previous years. Troubleshooting of job-hunting or internship challenges; professional conduct in person and online. Each student creates an updated resume, a schedule for job-hunting, and an online career portfolio. Advice on development of summary English project. Pre-requisite: SEL256. Spring semester. 1 credit.

Field Work (SEL 420)

Supervised involvement in a Writing Popular Fiction residency or other experiential work in the field of English.  Repeatable for credit. Permission required. Variable credit. Fee.

Internship (SEL 430)

Repeatable for credit. Permission required. Variable credit.

View courses and full requirements for this program in the current course catalog.

View Course Catalog