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Below are all of the courses you have to choose from in this academic major. Some are required while others are electives. Please view the course catalog to see what is required to earn a degree in this major.

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry (SBL 100)

Students participate in an inquiry-based, authentic research experience while developing basic core competencies needed for success in the life sciences, including written scientific communication, experimental design, and use of basic lab equipment. Emphasis is placed on the process of science, establishment of professional identity, and making connections to the liberal arts, such as ethics and the role of science in society. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit. Fee.

Principles of Biology (SBL 105)

This course is intended for Health Science majors who are preparing for careers in a medical or an allied-health profession. It requires a high-school level understanding of biological and chemical concepts and prepares students for advanced courses in cell biology, genetics, microbiology, and human physiology. This course does not fulfill requirements for the Biology major. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Medical Terminology (SBL 141)

An introductory study of medical terminology presented as background for work in the health professions. Course format is online self-instruction. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit.

1 Credit.

Medical Microbiology (SBL 222)

Study of the basic concepts of microbiology from a human health and disease perspective. Topics include: basic microbial cell biology and genetics, immunology, virology, pathogenicity, antimicrobial therapeutics, epidemiology and public health, and disease transmission. Primarily for students interested in health sciences. Prerequisites: SCH100, SCH110, or one semester of college-level chemistry; and SBL160, SBL162, or SHL214. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Medical Microbiology Laboratory (SBL 223)

This laboratory course introduces students to the study of clinically relevant microbes. Particular emphasis is placed on the practice and development of skills needed by those working in medical microbiology settings. Students identify one unknown bacterial strain, present a written scientific communication on the identification process and results, and maintain a clinical laboratory notebook. Primarily for students interested in health sciences. Prerequisites: SCH101, SCH111, or one semester equivalent of college-level chemistry; and SBL161, SBL163, or SHL215. Corequisite: SBL222. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Medical Genetics (SBL 238)

Study of the structure and function of chromosomes and genes with an emphasis on the medical relevance of genetics. Topics include: gene and chromosome structure and function; clinical cytogenetics; genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors in disease; patterns of inheritance; genetic engineering and genome analysis; pharmacogenomics to develop therapies (both personalized and predictive) for treating hereditary disorders; and other competencies in genetics necessary for health professionals. This course is intended for students interested in health sciences. Prerequisites: (SBL160 and SBL161) or (SBL162 and SBL163) or (SHL214 and SHL215) or (SHL216 and SHL217) or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: SBL213 (excluding physician assistant majors). Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Cell Biology (SBL 247)

An intermediate-level study of the cell as the basic unit of life. Topics include cell organization, transmembrane events, intracellular trafficking, chemical mediators, cell cycle, electrical signaling, and bioenergetics. Writing Intensive course. Prerequisites: SBL100, and (SBL160 and SBL161) or (SBL162 and SBL163) or SBL105, and (SCH110 and SCH111) or (SCH112 and SCH113) or (SCH120 and SCH121). Corequisite: SBL248. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Cell Biology Laboratory (SBL 248)

Inquiry-based, semester-long investigation of cell structure and function to complement topics in SBL247. Students gain first-hand experience with techniques commonly used in cell biological research including quantitative and fluorescent microscopy, cell culture, protein electrophoresis and qRT-PCR. Writing Intensive course. Prerequisites: SBL100, and (SBL160 and SBL161) or (SBL162 and SBL163), and (SCH110 and SCH111) or (SCH112 and SCH113) or (SCH120 and SCH121). Corequisite: SBL247. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Principles of Epidemiology (SBL 330)

Introduction to the study of disease and injury patterns in human populations and its application to the understanding, prevention, and treatment of public health problems. Prerequisites: SBL218 or SBL222 or permission of instructor, and SSS250. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

General Chemistry I (SCH 110)

A study of the basic concepts and fundamental principles of chemistry, designed for science majors, with emphasis on atomic structure, periodic trends, bonding, ionic and molecular structures, and aqueous chemical reactions. Students access and review scientific information, learning to critique credibility and reliability. With SCH111, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Quantitative Analysis I Laboratory (SCH 111)

Laboratory work is primarily quantitative, including volumetric and gravimetric analyses. An introduction to instrumental techniques is presented including visible and atomic absorption spectroscopy. With SCH110, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. Corequisite: SCH110. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

General Chemistry II (SCH 112)

Builds upon concepts from SCH110, with emphasis on gas laws, thermodynamics, properties of matter and solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, and acid-base chemistry. Prerequisite: SCH110. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Quantitative Analysis II Laboratory (SCH 113)

Continuation of topics introduced in SCH111. Corequisite: SCH112. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Organic Chemistry I (SCH 210)

A study of the chemistry of carbon compounds for science majors. Molecular structure, structure-property relationships, synthesis, reactions, and reaction mechanisms of the major classes of organic compounds. Examples of biological relevance are given. Prerequisites: SCH112 and SCH113. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (SCH 211)

Common laboratory techniques involved in organic synthesis with purification, isolation of natural products, structure elucidation, and qualitative analysis are emphasized. Hands-on experience with instrumentation. Synthesis experiments coordinated with lecture courses. For science majors. Pre- or co-requisite: SCH210. Fall semester. 2 credits. Fee.

2 Credits.

Organic Chemistry II (SCH 212)

Continuation of topics introduced in SCH210. Prerequisite: SCH210. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (SCH 213)

Continuation of topics introduced in SCH211. Pre- or co-requisite: SCH212. Spring semester. 2 credits. Fee.

2 Credits.

Biochemistry (SCH 325)

Chemical structures and biological functions of proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Survey of major metabolic pathways involving carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. Structure-function relationships of biological membranes. Nucleic acid metabolism and protein synthesis. Recombinant DNA technology. Prerequisites: SCH212 and SCH213. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Principles of Medical Care (SHL 100)

Provides an overview of the field of healthcare and the roles played by various healthcare practitioners. Best practices associated with patient care and healthcare delivery are emphasized. Students develop a personal perspective on their potential for a career in healthcare. For health science majors. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Human Anatomy & Physiology I (SHL 214)

A detailed study of the structure and function of the human body. Anatomical studies include gross, histological, and cytological perspectives and are correlated with physiology. Functional studies emphasize homeostatic, regulatory, and integrative mechanisms. Pathophysiological processes are compared with normal anatomy and physiology. Course is designed to meet the requirements for dietetics, exercise science, health science, medical technology, and physician assistant. Prerequisite: at least one semester of college chemistry or one year of high school chemistry. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab (SHL 215)

Designed to reinforce concepts learned in SHL214. Topics include: histology and the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Lab activities include dissections of animal specimens with anatomy comparable to humans and computer simulated physiology experiments. Corequisite: SHL214. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Human Anatomy & Physiology II (SHL 216)

Continuation of topics begun in SHL214. Prerequisite: SHL214. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab (SHL 217)

Continuation of topics begun in SHL214, reinforcing topics covered in SHL216. Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Lab activities include dissections of animal specimens with anatomy comparable to humans and computer simulated physiology experiments. Prerequisite: SHL215. Corequisite: SHL216. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Health Science Capstone Seminar (SHL 400)

In this capstone seminar, students develop a written proposal that outlines the goals and objectives for the experiential learning element and arrange activities for it. They also compose an essay with supporting evidence illustrating how the Program Learning Objectives have been addressed in courses required for the major. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit.

1 Credit.

Field Work (SHL 420)

Practical experience in a hospital, health agency, or other area related to health science. The work must be supervised and evaluated, and a paper submitted. Permission required. Fall and spring semesters. 2 credits.

Internship (SHL 430)

An intensive field learning experience with a career focus. Activities involve the student in direct work responsibilities under the supervision of a recognized professional in a particular area of health science. A contract must be developed by the student, faculty advisor, and field supervisor before the internship begins. Permission required. Prerequisite: SHL400. Repeatable for credit. Fall and spring semesters. 2 credits.

Research (SHL 435)

Participation in laboratory or clinical research on campus, at another academic institution, or at a medical facility. Permission required. Fall and spring semesters. 2 credits.

Calculus 1 with Analytic Geometry (SMA 130)

Real numbers, sets, relations, and functions. The calculus of one variable. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Calculator required. Prerequisite: a working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. Fall and spring semesters. 4 credits.

4 Credits.

Health Care Issues & Administration (SNT 330)

Introduction to the U.S. health care industry: its providers, stakeholders, principles, financing, and delivery systems. Examines current issues, ethics, and policies affecting the industry as well as specific topics related to dietetics. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

College Physics I (SPH 106)

This course is a trigonometry-based physics course that covers topics in the mechanics of motion. The course covers linear and nonlinear approximations in motion, acceleration, Newton’s law, relativity, gravity, work, circular motion, momentum and fluids, graph analysis, and problem solving skills. Prerequisite: Appropriate level of high school mathematics as determined during advisement. Corequisite: SPH107. Fall semester. 3 credits.

College Physics I Lab (SPH 107)

Laboratory course to complement topics covered in SPH106 weekly (3 hours). Corequisite: SPH106. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

College Physics II (SPH 108)

This trigonometry-based physics course covers topics in electromagnetism from waves to the theory of light matter. Topics include electricity, magnetism, and optics. The student gains a good foundation of the basic principles of graph analysis and problem-solving skills. Corequisite: SPH109. Spring semester. 3 credits.

College Physics II Lab (SPH 109)

Laboratory course to complement topics covered in SPH108 weekly (3 hours). Corequisite: SPH108. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

Lifespan Development (SPY 223)

An introductory study of the biological, cognitive, and social dimensions of development from conception to death. Designed especially for students in the physician assistant program or pursuing careers in health care. For non-majors and minors only. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Introduction to Counseling (SPY 270)

Introduces the skills necessary for effective interviewing and counseling. Various theoretical approaches to counseling. A variety of classroom exercises to promote the student’s ability to listen and respond effectively in helping relationships and in other interpersonal relationships. Fall and spring semesters, and ADP session 3 in odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

Abnormal Psychology (SPY 280)

Examines causes, symptoms, assessments, and treatment of abnormality from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Includes an introduction to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V), its historical origins, and contemporary critiques. Prerequisite: SPY110. Spring semester, and ADP session 1 in odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

Principles of Sociology (SSO 100)

Examines the social and cultural forces that shape the lives of individuals and groups; the socialization of the human person throughout the stages of life; the multiple functions of social groups, institutions, and culture; and introduction to sociological theories. Fall semester and ADP Session 1. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Health and Society (SSO 390)

Considers cultural understandings of health, illness, and healing. Examines the health care system in the United States and its problems. Studies the growing forms of alternative medicine in our society and the controversies surrounding them. Prerequisite: SSO100. Spring semester, even-numbered years, and ADP Session 5 in odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Introductory Statistics (SSS 250)

Designed to develop quantitative literacy, enabling students to produce, understand, and communicate statistical information. Prepares students to conduct research. Explores descriptive and inferential statistics that include parametric (Z, t, F) and non-parametric (chi-square) probability distributions. Ability to make recommendations based upon interpretation of statistical software output is emphasized. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall and spring semesters and ADP sessions 1, 3, and 4. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

View courses and full requirements for this program in the current course catalog.

View Course Catalog