Below are all of the courses you have to choose from in this academic major. Some are required while others are electives. Please view the course catalog to see what is required to earn a degree in this major.


Foundations of Scientific Inquiry (SBL 100)

Students participate in an inquiry-based, authentic research experience while developing basic core competencies needed for success in the life sciences, including written scientific communication, experimental design, and use of basic lab equipment. Emphasis is placed on the process of science, establishment of professional identity, and making connections to the liberal arts, such as ethics and the role of science in society. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Medical Terminology (SBL 141)

An introductory study of medical terminology presented as background for work in the health professions. Course format is online self-instruction. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit.

1 Credit.

Organismal Biology (SBL 160)

Study of the evolution of prokaryotes and eukaryotes and the diversity of plants and invertebrate animals. Corequisite: SBL161. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Organismal Biology Laboratory (SBL 161)

Laboratory study of the diversity of plants and invertebrate animals. Corequisite: SBL160. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Plant Biology and Ecology (SBL 162)

Study of form and function of vascular plants and basic ecological concepts. Prerequisites: SBL160 and SBL161. Corequisite: SBL163. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Plant Biology & Ecology Laboratory (SBL 163)

Laboratory study of anatomy and physiology of vascular plants and basic ecological concepts. Prerequisites: SBL160 and SBL161. Corequisite: SBL162. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Genetics (SBL 212)

Study of the basic principles of genetics. Topics include the molecular basis of heredity, Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, structure and function of chromosomes, and biotechnological applications. Prerequisites: SBL100 and either SBL160 and SBL161 or SBL162 and SBL163. Corequisite: SBL213. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Genetics Laboratory (SBL 213)

Investigative laboratory in which students gain practical experience in molecular genetic laboratory techniques. Prerequisites: SBL100, and either SBL160 and SBL161 or SBL162 and SBL163. Corequisite: SBL212 or SBL238. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

Medical Genetics (SBL 238)

Study of the structure and function of chromosomes and genes with an emphasis on the medical relevance of genetics. Topics include: gene and chromosome structure and function; clinical cytogenetics; genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors in disease; patterns of inheritance; genetic engineering and genome analysis; pharmacogenomics to develop therapies (both personalized and predictive) for treating hereditary disorders; and other competencies in genetics necessary for health professionals. This course is intended for students interested in health sciences. Prerequisites: SBL160 and SBL161, or SBL162 and SBL163, or SHL214 and SHL215, or SHL216 and SHL217, or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: SBL213 (excluding physician assistant majors). Spring semester. 3 credits.

Cell Biology (SBL 247)

An intermediate-level study of the cell as the basic unit of life. Topics include cell organization, transmembrane events, intracellular trafficking, chemical mediators, cell cycle, electrical signaling, and bioenergetics. Writing Intensive course (with SBL248). Prerequisites: SBL100, and either (SBL160 and SBL161) or (SBL162 and SBL163) or SHL105, and (SCH110 and SCH111) or (SCH112 and SCH113) or (SCH120 and SCH121). Corequisite: SBL248. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Cell Biology Laboratory (SBL 248)

Inquiry-based, semester-long investigation of cell structure and function to complement topics in SBL247. Students gain first-hand experience with techniques commonly used in cell biological research including quantitative and fluorescent microscopy, cell culture, protein electrophoresis and qRT-PCR. Writing Intensive course (with SBL247). Prerequisites: SBL100, and either SBL160 and SBL161 or SBL162 and SBL163 and SCH110 and SCH111 or SCH112 and SCH113 or SCH120 and SCH121. Corequisite: SBL247. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Biology Seminar (SBL 300)

Discussions of topics pertinent to the practice of biology. This course partially fulfills the biology capstone requirement. Prerequisites: SBL100 and one of: SBL212, SBL238, or SBL247. Fall semester. 1 credit.

1 Credit.

Special Topics in Biology (SBL 405)

In-depth study of a specific topic in biological science. Prerequisite: SBL247 or permission of instructor. Variable credit. Offered as needed. Repeatable for credit.

1 Credit.

General Chemistry I (SCH 110)

A study of the basic concepts and fundamental principles of chemistry, designed for science majors, with emphasis on atomic structure, periodic trends, bonding, ionic and molecular structures, and aqueous chemical reactions. Students access and review scientific information, learning to critique credibility and reliability. With SCH111, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Quantitative Analysis I Laboratory (SCH 111)

Laboratory work is primarily quantitative, including volumetric and gravimetric analyses. An introduction to instrumental techniques is presented including visible and atomic absorption spectroscopy. With SCH110, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. Corequisite: SCH110. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

General Chemistry II (SCH 112)

Builds upon concepts from SCH110, with emphasis on gas laws, thermodynamics, properties of matter and solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, and acid-base chemistry. Prerequisite: SCH110. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Quantitative Analysis II Lab (SCH 113)

Continuation of topics introduced in SCH111. Corequisite: SCH112. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Organic Chemistry I (SCH 210)

A study of the chemistry of carbon compounds for science majors. Molecular structure, structure — property relationships, synthesis, reactions, and reaction mechanisms of the major classes of organic compounds. Examples of biological relevance are given. Prerequisites: SCH112 and SCH113. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (SCH 211)

Emphasis on learning common laboratory techniques involved in organic synthesis and purification, isolation of natural products, structure elucidation, and qualitative analysis. Classical and instrumental methods. Experiments coordinated closely with lecture presentations. For science majors. Pre- or co-requisite: SCH210. Fall semester. 2 credits. Fee.

2 Credits.

Organic Chemistry II (SCH 212)

Continuation of topics introduced in SCH210. Prerequisite: SCH210. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (SCH 213)

Continuation of topics introduced in SCH211. Pre- or co-requisite: SCH212. Spring semester. 2 credits. Fee.

2 Credits.

Principles of Microeconomics (SEC 101)

Introduction to economic reasoning, terminology, and fundamental concepts. Emphasis on individual economic units, such as the household and the firm and how they affect and are affected by the various market structures existing in American capitalism. Basic algebra skills are recommended. Fall and spring semesters, and ADP sessions 1 and 4. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Connections (SLA 102)

Component of first year experience; incorporates academic strategies and orientation to college life and resources. Any student who does not earn a grade of C- or better in SLA102 must repeat the course in the next semester. Required for the Liberal Arts Curriculum for all students who enter as freshmen. Fall and spring semesters. Corequisite: SEL105 or SEL107. 1 credit.

1 Credit.

Faith, Religion, & Society (SLA 150)

An exploration of the foundational roles of faith and spirituality in human growth and development and in the shaping of human cultures. Opportunity to engage with the spiritual traditions of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. This course is strongly recommended for the first semester of enrollment. Required for the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall and spring semesters, J-Term. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Senior Integrative Seminar (SLA 400)

A capstone seminar which provides students an opportunity to examine personal values in relationship to society. Students reflect on their discipline, pursuit of knowledge, and personal life philosophy. Required for the Liberral Arts Curriculum. Seniors only. Fall, spring, and summer, J-Term. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Calculus 1 with Analytic Geometry (SMA 130)

Real numbers, sets, relations, and functions. The calculus of one variable. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Graphing calculator required. Prerequisite: a working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. Fall and spring semesters. 4 credits.

4 Credits.

Principles of Nutrition (SNT 300)

Study of nutrient function and metabolism, with application to nutritional needs of the healthy adult. Examines methods for determining diet quality and nutritional status. Covers current topics, with an emphasis on the development of opinion based on critical thinking. Prerequisite: SCH120 or SHL214. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

College Physics I (SPH 106)

This course is a trigonometry-based physics course that covers all the topics in the mechanics of motion. The course covers linear and nonlinear approximations in motion, acceleration, Newton’s law, relativity, gravity, work, circular motion, momentum and fluids, graph analysis, and problem solving skills. Prerequisite: Appropriate level of high school mathematics as determined during advisement. Corequisite: SPH107. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

College Physics I Lab (SPH 107)

Laboratory course to complement topics covered in SPH106. Laboratory exercises are both on-line and in-lab (3 hours). Corequisite: SPH106. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

College Physics II (SPH 108)

This trigonometry-based physics course covers all the topics in electromagnetism from waves to the theory of light matter. The course covers wave theory, resonance, static electricity, DC and AC circuitry, magnetics, optics, and an introduction to quantum physics. The student gains a good foundation of the basic principles of graph analysis and problem-solving skills. Corequisite: SPH109. Spring semester. 3 credits.

College Physics II Lab (SPH 109)

Laboratory course to complement topics covered in SPH108. Laboratory exercises will be both on-line and in-lab (3 hours). Corequisite: SPH108. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

General Physics I (SPH 110)

A thorough introduction into physics for those majoring in the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Topics include classical mechanics, heat, and electricity. With SPH111, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisite: SMA130. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

General Physics I Laboratory (SPH 111)

Laboratory course to accompany SPH110. With SPH110, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Corequisite: SPH110. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

General Physics II (SPH 112)

A continuation of SPH110 with topics including magnetism, optics, and electricity. Prerequisite: SPH110. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

General Physics II Laboratory (SPH 113)

The laboratory course to accompany SPH112. Corequisite: SPH112. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Introduction to Ethics (SPL 210)

Examines original texts in ethics and representative ethical issues. Satisfies the Philosophy requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Lifespan Development (SPY 223)

An introductory study of the biological, cognitive, and social dimensions of development from conception to death. Designed especially for students in the physician assistant program or pursuing careers in health care. For non-majors and minors only. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Latinos in the United States (SSO 305)

Employs sociological perspectives in examination of historical, social, economic, and cultural experiences of Latinos in the U.S. Topics include: U.S. involvement in Latin America and establishment of Latino communities; immigration paths of Latin American populations to the U.S.; and adaptation of Latino subgroups into U.S. society. Other issues include those related to gender, race, and culture within Latino communities and construction of Latino identities. Fall semester, odd-numbered years. Satisfies the U.S. Cultures requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Span.Study in Spain & Latin America (SSP 411)

This travel course provides Spanish study abroad and is open to students in J-term or M-term. It develops comprehension and communicative skills within the local culture using conversational approach, daily oral practice, and proficiency-oriented activities in small classrooms and authentic local contexts. J-term or M-term. Repeatable for credit. Variable credit. Satisfies Language Study requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum if taken for 3 credits. Fee.

Introductory Statistics (SSS 250)

Designed to enable students to read as well as do research. Explores descriptive and inferential statistics. Treats small and large samplings with such parametric and non-parametric probability distributions as Z, t, F, and chi-squared. Uses PSPP computer software. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall and spring semesters and ADP sessions 1, 3, and 4. Must be at least a second semester freshman student. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

View courses and full requirements for this program in the current course catalog.

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