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Study Genocide Teach Tolerance

Online Program GraphicSeton Hill's online certificate program in genocide and Holocaust studies is open to all students and scholars, but is of particular interest to current and future teachers, historians and political scientists. This program will provide you with a fuller understanding of the political, social and religious issues that give rise to acts of genocide, and how the lessons of history inform possible responses to the genocides that exist in the world today.

“As a child of Croatian immigrants, I was exposed to a lot of history and culture that was not exactly tolerant of others... it wasn't until my experience at Yad Vashem and at Seton Hill that I finally found some hope in the idea of teaching tolerance."

-John Capin

Learn more about the programs at Seton Hill University by completing this request for information form.

Why Choose Seton Hill?

Seton Hill University is uniquely positioned to offer training in the subject areas of genocide and the Holocaust. For nearly a decade, the University has successfully supported middle school and secondary educators in developing both instructional units and courses on these topics. Seton Hill’s courses are interdisciplinary in nature and address not only the Holocaust and other acts of genocide, but contemporary human rights issues as well.

National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education

As a Seton Hill student, you will also benefit from this one-of-a-kind Center, located on Seton Hill's campus and featuring online resources for all students.

Holocaust Center Logo

Study in Poland & Israel

  • Every summer the National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education sponsors a three-week institute for educators at Yad Vashem, the world center for Holocaust research in Israel. Students in this online certificate program are eligible to attend, and to earn three credits toward their certificate. The generous support of Ethel LeFrak makes it possible for the University to offer tuition assistance.
  • Opportunities to study in Poland are also available. 

Online Options

Seton Hill’s postbaccalaureate courses are offered online in two formats:

  • 15-credit (5 course) certificate.
  • 9-credit (3 course) concentration.

This enables you to choose the program that best meets your educational needs. Each program begins the course Genocide in Comparative Perspective. You then have a range of options for additional courses, including: Genocide and Human Rights, Critical Issues in Holocaust Studies, and Teaching Tolerance.

Scholarships

The Ethel LeFrak Student Scholars of the Holocaust FundScholarships Graphic

Students in the Genocide and Holocaust Studies Program at Seton Hill can apply for a scholarship through the LeFrak Student Scholars of the Holocaust Fund to offset the costs of tuition, research or travel associated with the program.

The Ethel LeFrak Outstanding Student Scholar of the Holocaust Award

This $1,000 award is presented annually to a student of the program who writes a reflection paper that best demonstrates a keen and advanced understanding of the lessons of the Holocaust or another specific act of genocide.

To Apply to the Certificate Program, You Will Need:

  • A completed graduate study application form (Apply online now for free!).
  • A bachelor's degree from an accredited institution and official undergraduate transcripts from all institutions attended.Apply Now Graphic
  • Official transcript(s) from any institution(s) in which post baccalaureate or graduate course work was completed.
  • One letter of recommendation written by appropriate professionals.
  • A current resume.
  • A letter of intent explaining how the Seton Hill certificate program can help you accomplish your professional goals.

Photo: Jewish women from Subcarpathian Rus, who have been selected for forced labor at Auschwitz-Birkenau, march toward their barracks after disinfection and headshaving. Credit: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Yad Vashem (Public Domain).