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Below are all of the courses you have to choose from in this academic major. Some are required while others are electives. Please view the course catalog to see what is required to earn a degree in this major.


Human Biology and Medicine (SBL 134)

Students use an inquiry-based approach to become informed evaluators of an unorthodox medical therapy. Studies in the scientific disciplines of physiology, immunology, nutrition, and pathology enable students to formulate and articulate rational conclusions concerning the validity of specific medical practices. Group investigative activities are emphasized. Satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Medical Terminology (SBL 141)

An introductory study of medical terminology presented as background for work in the health professions. Course format is online self-instruction. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit.

1 Credit.

Introduction to Criminal Justice (SCJ 110)

Provides an overview of the criminal justice system in the United States, including the historical and contemporary operation of police, courts, and corrections. Examines differences between the adult and juvenile justice systems. Reviews ethical guidelines for criminal justice professions. A 20-hour service learning requirement introduces students to the components, best practices, and career opportunities in the criminal justice field. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Restorative Justice (SCJ 180)

This course provides a thorough introduction to restorative justice theory and practice by exploring the theoretical roots of the restorative justice movement and the methods used in the field. Students develop proficiency in discipline-specific writing. Writing Intensive course. Spring semester. Prequisite: SEL106 or SEL107. 3 credits.

Juvenile Delinquency (SCJ 220)

Provides an overview of the principles and operation of the juvenile justice system, with a particular focus on restorative justice. Surveys theories and research on the nature, extent, and causes of delinquency and strategies for preventing and treating delinquent behavior. Fall semester. 3 credits.

The Criminal Court (SCJ 225)

Examines the organization and structure of criminal courts in the United States and their functioning in relation to other components of the criminal justice system. Stages in the criminal court process and the roles played by the judge, defense counsel, police, probation officers, and other personnel in that process are discussed. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Corrections (SCJ 300)

Examines the legally sanctioned methods of dealing with lawbreakers including institutional corrections, community corrections, and dispositions including community service, restitution programs, victim awareness programs, and electronic monitoring. A 20-hour service learning component introduces students to correctional facilities, practices, and personnel. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors only. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Female Crime and Delinquency (SCJ 325)

Examines the biological, psychological, and socio-cultural correlates of gender and gender-based crime, both adult and juvenile, in American society. Students utilize current research studies to examine criminology theories and their applicability to women and juvenile females. Prerequisite: SCJ220. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Intro to Exceptional Children (SED 205)

Educational philosophies and instructional strategies for children with special needs. Topics focus on specific characteristics of various disabilities, cultural and language barriers, gifted and talented, current legislation, inclusion strategies, and current issues in the field. Field experience is a required component of this course. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Characteristics and Strategies I (SED 208)

Examines the characteristics and causes of high incidence disabilities. Emphasis is placed on identification, learning needs, instructional strategies, programming, assessment practices, transition, research, and current practices. Field experience is a required component of this course. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Prerequisite: SED205. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Characteristics and Strategies II (SED 209)

Examines the causes and characteristics of individuals with severe and profound disabilities. Emphasis is placed on identification, legal issues, programming, assessment, instructional models, transition, research, and promising practices. Field experiences required. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Prerequisite: SED205. Spring semester. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Human Anatomy & Physiology I (SHL 214)

A detailed study of the structure and function of the human body. Anatomical studies include gross, histological, and cytological perspectives and are correlated with physiology. Functional studies emphasize homeostatic, regulatory, and integrative mechanisms. Pathophysiological processes are compared with normal anatomy and physiology. Course is designed to meet the requirements for dietetics, exercise science, health science, medical technology, and physician assistant. Prerequisite: at least one semester of college chemistry or one year of high school chemistry. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab (SHL 215)

Designed to reinforce concepts learned in SHL214. Topics include: histology and the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Lab activities include dissections of animal specimens with anatomy comparable to humans and computer simulated physiology experiments. Corequisite: SHL214. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Introductory Psychology (SPY 110)

An introduction to the history, concepts, principles, and problems of modern psychology including experiential study. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Abnormal Psychology (SPY 280)

Examines causes, symptoms, assessments, and treatment of abnormality from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Includes an introduction to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V), its historical origins, and contemporary critiques. Prerequisite: SPY110. Spring semester, and ADP session 1 in odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

Biological Psychology (SPY 350)

A study of the biological basics of behavior including the structure and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Special topics include physiological processes related to emotions, gender, psychological abnormality, and perception. Satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisite: SPY110. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Personality Theory (SPY 370)

A consideration of the research and theory aimed at understanding those characteristics of the person which are related to his or her distinctive ways of experiencing or behaving. Major theoretical perspectives on personality such as trait theories, social learning theory, psychoanalytic theories, and phenomenological theories are examined. Prerequisite: SPY110. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Psychology of Sex and Gender (SPY 405)

Examines both human sex (the biological identification as male/female) and gender (the social construct of feminine/masculine) from a psychological perspective. Emphasis on examining biological, psychological, and social factors that influence sex and gender similarities and differences in areas such as development, aggression, achievement, communication, relationships, employment, and physical and mental health. Juniors and seniors only. Prerequisite: SPY110. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Counseling: History and Practice (SPY 515)

Examines the development of marriage and family therapy and counseling professions, major contemporary theories of counseling and MFT and psychotherapy, the relationship of the theories studied to clinical practice, and the components of an adequate theory. Students articulate their own developing theoretical orientations. Must be completed with a grade of B- (2.67) or higher for continuation in the art therapy program. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Interpersonal Processes (SPY 520)

Theories and skills of psychotherapy. Students learn to conceptualize client issues, assess the usefulness of a variety of treatment modalities and approaches, and respond emphatically and effectively as psychotherapists. Role-playing and peer counseling are utilized to enhance students’ therapy skills and self understanding. This course is a prerequisite to continuation in the art therapy and marriage and family therapy programs, and to SFT552. This course must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or higher. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Assessment (SPY 525)

Teaches skills for individual and family assessment and evaluation, including interviewing and observational techniques; selection, administration, and interpretation of individual and group tests; and family assessment techniques. Must be completed with a grade of B- (2.67) or higher for continuation in the art therapy program. Spring semester. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Principles of Sociology (SSO 100)

Examines the social and cultural forces that shape the lives of individuals and groups; the socialization of the human person throughout the stages of life; the multiple functions of social groups, institutions, and culture; and introduction to sociological theories. Fall semester and ADP Session 1. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Race, Class, and Gender (SSO 200)

Reviews research on cultural definitions of race, class, and gender and their consequences for social life; institutional stratification and efforts to reduce inequalities; and attempts to revise the meaning of race, class, and gender in American culture. Spring semester and ADP Session 1. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Aging and Old Age (SSO 365)

Theoretical and applied examination of aging and the aged in American society. Primary emphasis on the roles of the aged and identity structures offered them. ADP session 1, even-numbered years. 3 credits.

Health and Society (SSO 390)

Considers cultural understandings of health, illness, and healing. Examines the health care system in the United States and its problems. Studies the growing forms of alternative medicine in our society and the controversies surrounding them. Prerequisite: SSO100. Spring semester, even-numbered years, and ADP Session 5 in odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Introductory Statistics (SSS 250)

Designed to develop quantitative literacy, enabling students to produce, understand, and communicate statistical information. Prepares students to conduct research. Explores descriptive and inferential statistics that include parametric (Z, t, F) and non-parametric (chi-square) probability distributions. Ability to make recommendations based upon interpretation of statistical software output is emphasized. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall and spring semesters and ADP sessions 1, 3, and 4. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Research Methods (SSS 251)

Introduces students to the procedures that are used in conducting research in the social sciences. Provides practice in designing research studies using quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods approaches. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Understanding Addictions (SSW 122)

Provides background essentials for the understanding of addiction: history of human alcohol/drug use, meaning of addiction, social impact, psychological and physiological effects, family dynamics, and special subgroups in addiction. The basic outpatient and inpatient approaches to addiction are reviewed with an emphasis on prevention, assessment, dual diagnosis, treatment effectiveness, family and group interventions, and the role of Alcoholics/Narcotics Anonymous. Fall, even-numbered years and ADP session 3, odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Intro to Profession of Social Work (SSW 150)

Introduction to the development of the social work profession, the current state of the profession, the generalist practice method, and the populations currently served by the profession. Students learn to identify common human needs and recognize some of the internal and external obstacles that interfere with optimal social functioning. A 15-hour service learning component introduces students to various methodologies and fields of social work practice. Fall semester. 3 credits. Fee.

Social Welfare (SSW 210)

An examination of the historical and contemporary social purposes, values, and policies of the institution of social welfare. Considers the social, political, and economic origins and consequences of societal provisions for economic security and social services. Satisfies the U.S. Cultures requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Human Behavior & Soc. Environment I (SSW 250)

Integrates knowledge obtained from the Liberal Arts Curriculum to understand the biological, psychological, social, and cultural determinants of human behavior for infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. Theories of human development and human behavior are critically examined to determine their applicability to diverse populations. An ecological life model perspective is integrated with systems theory in order to help students recognize the relationship among micro (individual), mezzo (family and group), and macro (organizations, communities, and society) level problems. Pre- or co-requisite: SSW150. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Human Behavior & Soc. Environ. II (SSW 251)

An integrated biological, psychological, social, and cultural approach to understanding human behavior in middle and late adulthood. An ecological life model perspective is utilized in studying theories and concepts of organizations, groups, and community behavior. Pre- or co-requisite: SSW150. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Organizations-Admin. & Research (SSW 300)

Introduces students to the theory and skills required for working in and managing public and private human service organizations, including planning, design, human resources, supervision, finance, development, information systems evaluation, quality improvement, organizational change, and leadership. Students write a proposal for a program of their choice. Writing Intensive course. Prerequisite: SSW251. Fall semester in odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Social Policy (SSW 310)

Introduces students to policy practice in public and private organizations and in community and legislative arenas. The student learns to analyze policy problems and determine policy options and strategy and to implement and evaluate policies in various settings. The student writes a paper describing and analyzing a policy project. Pre- or co-requisite: SSW251. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Generalist Practice I: Individuals (SSW 330)

Establishes both a theoretical and practical, skills-based foundation for social work practice with individuals. A strengths-based, culturally competent perspective is emphasized. A 15-hour service learning component introduces students to individual practice in public and/or private human service organizations. Only open to students who are candidates for BSW degree. Prerequisite: SSW255. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

General. Prac. II:Families & Groups (SSW 331)

Establishes both a theoretical and a practical, skills-based foundation for social work practice with families and groups. A strengths-based, culturally competent perspective is emphasized. A 15-hour service learning component introduces students to family and group practice in public and/or private human service organizations. Prerequisite: SSW330. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Gen.Prac.III:Organization & Commun. (SSW 332)

Establishes both a theoretical and a practical, skills-based foundation for macro level generalist social work practice. Formal organizations and ad hoc community groups within neighborhoods and communities are analyzed, students learn the mediating role of organizations in urban communities, and they focus on macro level concerns including oppression, discrimination, social change efforts, the role of partisan politics, and the uses of power to affect community change. A 15-hour service learning component introduces students to macro practice in private human service organizations and in communities. Open only to students who are candidates for BSW degree. Prerequisite: SSW331. Spring semester. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Senior Synthesis in Social Work (SSW 400)

A capstone course which integrates theory, research, and practice in social work with the liberal arts knowledge base. Review of key social work principles applicable to generalist practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities occurs in seminar discussions and through the execution of an independent research project. The capstone requirements are completed in this course. Prerequisite: SSW440. Spring semester. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Field Practicum (SSW 440)

Provides 500 hours of directed field learning for senior students who are majoring in Social Work. A field placement in a public or private human service organization provides the opportunity for students to relate theories and principles of social work to generalist practice with appropriate supervision and MSW consultation. A concurrent, weekly, on-campus seminar is also required. The seminar is designed to strengthen the student’s experiences as an individual, family, group, or macro systems change agent. The weekly seminar does not count toward the 500 hours of field experience. Open only to students who are candidates for BSW degree. Prerequisite: SSW332. Permission required. Fall semester. 12 credits. Fee.

12 Credits.

Field Practicum (SSW 441)

Provides 500 hours of directed field learning for seniors majoring in social work. A field placement in a public or private human service organization provides the opportunity for students to relate theories and principles of social work to generalist practice with appropriate supervision and MSW consultation. A concurrent, on-campus seminar is also required during the fall semester, and meetings are scheduled with the instructor during the spring semester. The seminar is designed to strengthen the student’s experiences as an individual, family, group, or macro systems change agent. The weekly seminar does not count toward the 500 hours of field experience. Students must complete a total of 12 credits for the major. The course is taken in two consecutive semesters of 6 credits each (SSW441, taken twice). A grade change to the first course may be required upon completion of the second course to reflect final work. Open only to BSW candidates. Prerequisite: SSW332. Permission required. Fall, spring, and summer. 6 credits. Repeatable for credit. Fee.

View courses and full requirements for this program in the current course catalog.

View Course Catalog