Below are all of the courses you have to choose from in this academic major. Some are required while others are electives. Please view the course catalog to see what is required to earn a degree in this major.


Medical Terminology (SBL 141)

An introductory study of medical terminology presented as background for work in the health professions. Course format is online self-instruction. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit.

1 Credit.

Principles of Accounting I (SBU 100)

General introduction to accounting principles and bookkeeping methods; the theory of debit and credit; financial statements; working papers; adjusting and closing entries. Fall semester and ADP sessions 1 and 3. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Business Plan Development (SBU 115)

Examines the research, planning, and development of a business plan with emphasis on four fundamental core elements of business planning. Fall and spring semesters and ADP sessions 1 and 3. 1 credit.

1 Credit.

Principles of Management (SBU 180)

Process of management in both profit and non-profit organizations. Emphasis on major functions of management, with decision-making as integral part of each, including planning, organizing, leading, staffing and training, development, and marketing. Fall and spring semesters and ADP sessions 1, 2, 3, and 5. 3 credits.

Intro Sports Management (SBU 185)

An overview of the field of Sports Management. Includes the nature of various careers within the sports industry and understanding of management processess. Identifies trends, current events, and innovations within the sport and fitness world and how these impact managerial decision processes. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Marketing (SBU 220)

Management problem-solving approaches of marketing. Basic marketing functions including product/service planning, distribution activities, location, logistics, promotion strategies, sales, e-commerce, advertising, and pricing techniques. Technological tools. Ethical ramifications. Cases and simulations supplement material. Fall semester and ADP session 1. 3 credits.

Oral Communication (SCA 130)

Students develop informative, persuasive, and expressive speaking proficiencies. Practice in personal communication skills, writing for the ear, effective listening, oral reports, and the use of body language, visual aids, technologies, and occasions to motivate and enhance communication. Fall and spring semesters and ADP session 4. 3 credits.

Chemical Principles (SCH 100)

Designed to introduce the allied health student to essential and basic chemical concepts. The topics include matter, energy, the metric system, atomic theory, the periodic table, ionic and molecular bonding and structure, the mole and mass relations in chemical reactions, kinetics, equilibrium, gases, solutions, an introduction to acids and bases, and nuclear chemistry. With SCH101, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Chemical Principles Laboratory (SCH 101)

Experiments conducted in the laboratory course complement the concepts discussed in the lecture. With SCH100, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

General Chemistry I (SCH 110)

A study of the basic concepts and fundamental principles of chemistry, designed for science majors, with emphasis on atomic structure, periodic trends, bonding, ionic and molecular structures, and aqueous chemical reactions. Students access and review scientific information, learning to critique credibility and reliability. With SCH111, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Quantitative Analysis I Laboratory (SCH 111)

Laboratory work is primarily quantitative, including volumetric and gravimetric analyses. An introduction to instrumental techniques is presented including visible and atomic absorption spectroscopy. With SCH110, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. Corequisite: SCH110. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

General Chemistry II (SCH 112)

Builds upon concepts from SCH110, with emphasis on gas laws, thermodynamics, properties of matter and solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, and acid-base chemistry. Prerequisite: SCH110. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Quantitative Analysis II Lab (SCH 113)

Continuation of topics introduced in SCH111. Corequisite: SCH112. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Organic Chemistry Principles (SCH 120)

Provides the allied health student with an introduction to acid-base chemistry, as well as the structures, properties, and reactivities of the major functional groups of organic compounds. Computerized molecular modeling is integral to the course. Prerequisites: SCH100 and SCH101 or the equivalent. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Organic Chemistry Principles Lab (SCH 121)

Experiments conducted in the laboratory course complement the concepts discussed in the lecture and include computerized molecular modeling. Prerequisites: SCH100 and SCH101 or the equivalent. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Introduction to Exercise Science (SER 110)

Introduces students to all facets of the exercise science discipline by exploring concepts, ethics, certification, licensure, employment opportunities, and sub-disciplines. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Emergency Preparation (SER 120)

Students acquire skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), AED, and first aid necessary to treat emergency situations. Individuals who meet required standards receive certification in each respective skill for two years. Fall and spring semesters. Repeatable for credit. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Exercise Leadership (SER 200)

Students learn how to lead exercises for individuals and groups in a variety of settings. Design, populations, and outcomes of mainstream fitness programs are evaluated. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Physiology of Sport and Exercise (SER 205)

Focuses on the physiological bases of exercise with emphasis on the responses and adaptations of the human body to a variety of exercise stimuli. Laboratory included. Co- or pre-requisites: SHL214 and SHL215. Fall semester. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Strength TrainingTheory/Prog Design (SER 220)

Emphasizes strength training techniques and designing programs for individual workout sessions and periodization. Prepares students for an appropriate National Commission for Certifying Agencies credentialed certification. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Testing & Exercise Prescription (SER 310)

Provides theoretical and practical information about exercise testing procedures and evaluation for a variety of common tests and exercise prescription through interpretation of testing results. Prerequisite: SER205. Corequisite: SER311. Writing Intensive course. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Testing & Exercise Prescription Lab (SER 311)

Laboratory course that provides hands-on experience with procedures, equipment, and material discussed in SER310. Prerequisite: SER205. Corequisite: SER310. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

Biomechanics (SER 320)

This course focuses on function of the human body and the mechanical principals effecting its movement. In-depth exploration of how movement occurs in anatomical planes, axes, and functional movements. Prerequisites: SHL214, SHL215, SPH106, and SPH107. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Clinical Exercise Physiology (SER 350)

This course examines cardiopulmonary exercise physiology, the pathophysiology of selected cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, electrocardiography, and clinical graded exercise testing. The influences of age, sex, culture, and ethnicity on risk factors for, prevalence of, and outcomes associated with selected cardiovascular and respiratory diseases are emphasized. Prerequisite: SER205. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Evidence-Based Practice (SER 390)

Designed to teach the components of evidence-based practice. Students learn how to search for, read, evaluate, and summarize exercise science research and review articles. Research methods are also discussed. Prerequisite: SSS250. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Special Populations (SER 400)

Discusses in-depth changes that occur due to acute and chronic exercise and the impact of aging on these processes. Various chronic medical conditions are examined regarding the physiological differences of these ailments as they relate to exercise. Prerequisite: SER350. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Prevent & Treat Exercise Injuries (SER 425)

Discusses the injury and healing process of common injuries associated with exercise and athletic participation. Treatment and management of a variety of conditions and their effect on exercise in healthy and special needs populations are discussed. Prerequisite: SER350. Fall semester. 2 credits

2 Credits.

Exercise Science Senior Synthesis (SER 427)

During this capstone course students articulate the integration of the University Learning Objectives with those of the exercise science major. Students prepare for an off-campus internship and review skills and techniques needed to register for an appropriate National Commission for Certifying Agencies credentialed certification. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Exercise Science Internship (SER 430)

An off-campus, hands-on experience arranged by the student with the assistance of the faculty. The student must complete 480 hours in an appropriate exercise science setting. Activities involve the student in direct work responsibilities under the supervision of a qualified individual. An affiliation agreement must be in place before the internship begins. Prerequisites: All coursework for the major must be completed prior to starting the internship experience. Special circumstances may be considered by the instructor to allow a student to begin the internship before all courses have been completed. Internship applications must be submitted to the instructor the semester prior to registering for the internship experience. Permission required. Fall, spring, and summer. 12 credits.

12 Credits.

Human Anatomy & Physiology I (SHL 214)

A detailed study of the structure and function of the human body. Anatomical studies include gross, histological, and cytological perspectives and are correlated with physiology. Functional studies emphasize homeostatic, regulatory, and integrative mechanisms. Pathophysiological processes are compared with normal anatomy and physiology. Course is designed to meet the requirements for dietetics, exercise science, health science, medical technology, and physician assistant. Prerequisite: at least one semester of college chemistry or one year of high school chemistry. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab (SHL 215)

Designed to reinforce concepts learned in SHL214. Topics include: histology and the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Lab activities include dissections of animal specimens with anatomy comparable to humans and computer simulated physiology experiments. Corequisite: SHL214. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

Human Anatomy & Physiology II (SHL 216)

Continuation of topics begun in SHL214. Prerequisite: SHL214. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab (SHL 217)

Continuation of topics begun in SHL214, reinforcing topics covered in SHL216. Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Lab activities include dissections of animal specimens with anatomy comparable to humans and computer simulated physiology experiments. Prerequisite: SHL215. Corequisite: SHL216. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

Nutrition for Life (SNT 160)

Introductory study of nutrition principles and their relationship to health. Discussion of topics such as vegetarianism, dieting, and eating disorders. Laboratory experiences investigating nutritional content of food and related topics. Satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall, spring, and summer and ADP Session 1. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Sports Nutrition (SNT 161)

Sports Nutrition focuses on knowledge and application of sports nutrition and performance. Topics include energy expenditure during resistance and endurance exercise, timing of pre- and post-competition meals, special needs of various athletic groups, energy metabolism by macro and micronutrients, and their role in weight control with athletes. Safety and validity of proposed ergogenic aids are also investigated. Satisfies Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Spring semester. 3 credits. Fee.

Principles of Nutrition (SNT 300)

Study of nutrient function and metabolism, with application to nutritional needs of the healthy adult. Examines methods for determining diet quality and nutritional status. Covers current topics, with an emphasis on the development of opinion based on critical thinking. Prerequisite: SCH120 or SHL214. Spring semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

College Physics I (SPH 106)

This course is a trigonometry-based physics course that covers all the topics in the mechanics of motion. The course covers linear and nonlinear approximations in motion, acceleration, Newton’s law, relativity, gravity, work, circular motion, momentum and fluids, graph analysis, and problem solving skills. Prerequisite: Appropriate level of high school mathematics as determined during advisement. Corequisite: SPH107. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

College Physics I Lab (SPH 107)

Laboratory course to complement topics covered in SPH106. Laboratory exercises are both on-line and in-lab (3 hours). Corequisite: SPH106. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

1 Credit.

College Physics II (SPH 108)

This trigonometry-based physics course covers all the topics in electromagnetism from waves to the theory of light matter. The course covers wave theory, resonance, static electricity, DC and AC circuitry, magnetics, optics, and an introduction to quantum physics. The student gains a good foundation of the basic principles of graph analysis and problem-solving skills. Corequisite: SPH109. Spring semester. 3 credits.

College Physics II Lab (SPH 109)

Laboratory course to complement topics covered in SPH108. Laboratory exercises will be both on-line and in-lab (3 hours). Corequisite: SPH108. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

Lifespan Development (SPY 223)

An introductory study of the biological, cognitive, and social dimensions of development from conception to death. Designed especially for students in the physician assistant program or pursuing careers in health care. For non-majors and minors only. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Sports Psychology (SPY 275)

Covers various psychological principles associated with sports. Discussions of psychological variables that hinder or enhance athletic performance. Bridges the gap between theory and real world situations. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Principles of Sociology (SSO 100)

Examines the social and cultural forces that shape the lives of individuals and groups; the socialization of the human person throughout the stages of life; the multiple functions of social groups, institutions, and culture; and introduction to sociological theories. Fall semester and ADP Session 1. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Introductory Statistics (SSS 250)

Designed to enable students to read as well as do research. Explores descriptive and inferential statistics. Treats small and large samplings with such parametric and non-parametric probability distributions as Z, t, F, and chi-squared. Uses PSPP computer software. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall and spring semesters and ADP sessions 1, 3, and 4. Must be at least a second semester freshman student. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

View courses and full requirements for this program in the current course catalog.

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