Skip to Main Content
dropdownCombined ShapedropdowndropdownnextGroup 3circle_arrow_left_redGroup 2Group 8Group 35homelocationSeton Hill Universityphonemagnifying-glass

Below are all of the courses you have to choose from in this academic major. Some are required while others are electives. Please view the course catalog to see what is required to earn a degree in this major.

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry (SBL 100)

Students participate in an inquiry-based, authentic research experience while developing basic core competencies needed for success in the life sciences, including written scientific communication, experimental design, and use of basic lab equipment. Emphasis is placed on the process of science, establishment of professional identity, and making connections to the liberal arts, such as ethics and the role of science in society. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit. Fee.

Human Biology and Medicine (SBL 134)

Students use an inquiry-based approach to become informed evaluators of an unorthodox medical therapy. Studies in the scientific disciplines of physiology, immunology, nutrition, and pathology enable students to formulate and articulate rational conclusions concerning the validity of specific medical practices. Group investigative activities are emphasized. Satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

The Environment:Issues & Choices (SBL 145)

This course is designed to give a non-science major an understanding of the interrelationship between the natural environment and humans, including the biological, social, and economic aspects of current environmental challenges. It focuses on building the scientific framework necessary to understand environmental issues. Satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Spring semester. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Principles of Management (SBU 180)

Process of management in both profit and non-profit organizations. Emphasis on major functions of management, with decision-making as integral part of each, including planning, organizing, leading, staffing and training, development, and marketing. Fall and spring semesters and ADP sessions 1, 2, 3, and 5. 3 credits.

Marketing (SBU 220)

Management problem-solving approaches of marketing. Basic marketing functions including product/service planning, distribution activities, location, logistics, promotion strategies, sales, e-commerce, advertising, and pricing techniques. Technological tools. Ethical ramifications. Cases and simulations supplement material. Fall semester and ADP session 1. 3 credits.

Communication Theory (SCA 100)

An overview of the theoretical foundations and principles of the communication process. Emphasis on how theory guides decisions in communication problem-solving, the design and development of information resources, and the influence, challenge, and power of the mass media and social media to effect change. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Oral Communication (SCA 130)

Students develop informative, persuasive, and expressive speaking proficiencies. Practice in personal communication skills, writing for the ear, effective listening, oral reports, and the use of body language, visual aids, technologies, and occasions to motivate and enhance communication. Fall and spring semesters and ADP session 4. 3 credits.

Organizational Leadership (SCA 280)

Study of various types of groups, leadership, problem-solving approaches, performance appraisal, conflict resolution, decision-making strategies, and nonverbal communication skills to facilitate small and large group effectiveness. Spring semester and ADP session 3. 3 credits. Fee.

Advocacy Media for Social Change (SCA 310)

Students critically examine the philosophical foundations and principles of communication and social advocacy to engage the news media, help organize a community, and influence action. Topics include: the social activist and community outreach; leveraging social networks; power, powerlessness, and empowerment; contextual analysis, problem identification, and power mapping; lobbying, leadership, and coalition-building; advocacy journalism; and assessment strategies. Spring semester. 3 credits. Fee.

Chemical Principles (SCH 100)

Designed to introduce the allied health student to essential and basic chemical concepts. The topics include matter, energy, the metric system, atomic theory, the periodic table, ionic and molecular bonding and structure, the mole and mass relations in chemical reactions, kinetics, equilibrium, gases, solutions, and an introduction to acids and bases. With SCH101, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Chemical Principles Laboratory (SCH 101)

Experiments conducted in the laboratory course complement the concepts discussed in the lecture. This course focuses on important chemical principles, safe laboratory techniques, and correct calculations. With SCH100 or SCH106, satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Corequisite: SCH100 or SCH106. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

Chemistry for Living (SCH 102)

Designed to increase the non-scientist’s awareness of how chemistry affects her/his daily life, from consumer goods to global problems. Satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Offered as needed. 3 credits. Fee.

Organic Chemistry Principles (SCH 120)

A study of the chemistry of carbon compounds for the allied health majors. A systematic examination of molecular structures, structure-property relationships, and chemical reactivities of the major functional groups of organic compounds. Prerequisites: SCH100 or SCH106 or the equivalent. Spring semester. 3 credits.

Organic Chemistry Principles Lab (SCH 121)

Experiments conducted in the laboratory course complement the concepts discussed in the lecture. Common laboratory techniques involved in organic synthesis, purification, and isolation of natural products are emphasized. Prerequisites: SCH100 and SCH101 or the equivalent. Corequisite: SCH120 or SCH122. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

Found'ns of Education & School Law (SED 110)

This is an introductory course stressing the Pennsylvania Core Standards, philosophy, history, psychology, law, and sociology of education. Certification, school law, foundations, current issues, trends in special education and vocational technical education, and other topics related to the teaching profession are introduced. Student experiences culminate in the development of a personal philosophy of education and observations in an area school to provide an opportunity for a special investigation of the profession. Field component required. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Prin. of Instructional Technologies (SED 118)

General information for teachers on integrating modern technology in PreK-12 classrooms. The use of current equipment, assistive technology, computer programs, Web 2.0 applications, and mobile technology to enhance teaching and learning in both traditional and online classes are explored and evaluated. Fall and spring semesters, online in J-term. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Teaching Strategies PreK to Grade 4 (SED 202)

This course presents the learning theories, teaching and learning approaches of early childhood education, the Pennsylvania and NAEYC professional standards, code of ethics, and the skills necessary to succeed in meeting the needs of young children. Instructional content and diverse approaches in early childhood education are presented. Discussions of early literacy, spiritual development, discipline, diversity, anti-bias strategies, and family relationships. Emphasis on NAEYC’s developmentally appropriate practices. Field component required. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Intro to Exceptional Children (SED 205)

Educational philosophies and instructional strategies for children with special needs. Topics focus on specific characteristics of various disabilities, cultural and language barriers, gifted and talented, current legislation, inclusion strategies, and current issues in the field. Field experience is a required component of this course. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Typical & Atypical Growth Develop (SED 206)

Examines human development from conception through adolescence. Typical and atypical physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development of children, development in areas of physical, sensory, and motor development, atypical behavior, and mental health issues as they relate to and impact children with and without special needs are presented. Field component required. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Fall and spring semesters, online. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Characteristics and Strategies I (SED 208)

Examines the characteristics and causes of high incidence disabilities. Emphasis is placed on identification, learning needs, instructional strategies, programming, assessment practices, transition, research, and current practices. Field experience is a required component of this course. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Prerequisite: SED205. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Characteristics and Strategies II (SED 209)

Examines the causes and characteristics of individuals with severe and profound disabilities. Emphasis is placed on identification, legal issues, programming, assessment, instructional models, transition, research, and promising practices. Field experiences required. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Prerequisite: SED205. Spring semester. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Science and Health (SED 223)

This course includes the Pennsylvania Core Standards, trends, materials, state standards, and approaches for the teaching of science/health concepts and processes in elementary education. Active engagement in science/health experiments/presentations and procedures within a laboratory approach and inclusion strategies for students with physical disabilities are presented. Field experience is a required component of this course. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Prerequisite: SED202. Fall semester. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Social Studies (SED 224)

Lesson planning for the teacher of elementary social studies based on Pennsylvania Core Standards and NCSS Standards is stressed. Instructional techniques for the teaching of history, geography, civics, and economics to diverse learners receive major focus. Focus is on professionals and professional organizations, the use of curricular materials and technology, and inclusion strategies for students with emotional and behavioral disabilities. Field experience is a required component of this course. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Prerequisite: SED202. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Teaching English Language Learners (SED 227)

Prepares instructors for teaching students who speak English as a second language. Research theories and practical applications are presented in preparing Pre-K to 12 instructors including: a survey of research in the linguistic, psychologial, and sociolinguistic aspects of second language acquisition, instructional strategies, and appropriate assessments. Field component required. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Prerequisite: SED110 or SMU102. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Art, Music, and Movement (SED 235)

Creative drama and the value of play in early childhood education by enhancing artistic sensitivity through art and music, developing self-awareness, and integrating mental and physical activity are examined. Field component required. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Prerequisite: SED 202. Fall and spring semesters, J-Term. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Parent and Family Conferencing (SED 240)

The effect of a child on a family is investigated. Students acquire knowledge and skills in involving parents in the educational development of programs for their children. The course is designed to develop effective techniques for conferencing, problem-solving, and establishing good working relationships with (para-)professionals and with parents/family members of children and the involvement of community resources. Writing Intensive course. Field component required. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Prerequisite: SED 205. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Internship (SED 430)

Permission required. Repeatable for credit. Variable credit.

3 Credits.

Sr Synthesis in Education(Non-cert) (SED 437)

This capstone course integrates theory, research, and practice in education (General and Special Education, non-certificate majors) with the liberal arts knowledge base. Contemporary issues confronting education, best practice research, and inclusive principles of education are reviewed. The student's e-portfolio, resume, and career plan are completed. Permission required. Pass/Fail only. Fall and spring semesters. 1 credit.

1 Credit.

Fundamentals of Criminalistics (SFN 105)

This course provides an introduction to the broad range of forensic services offered by crime labs. The student gains an understanding of the scientific basis of forensic services through a general study of biology, chemistry, physics, and statistics. Topics include processing a crime scene, trace and contact evidence, identification of body fluids, DNA analysis, drugs of abuse, bloodstain patterns, fingerprints, and firearms. The student performs selected forensic techniques in the laboratory. Satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits. Fee.

West & North African Lit & Clt (SFR 330)

Reading of contemporary novels of Mahgreb and West Africa. Introduction to geographical and historical events, survey of African cinema, and women’s writing. Satisfies the Global Perspectives requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Spring semester, even-numbered years. 3 credits. Fee.

Southeast Asia Literature & Culture (SFR 342)

Explores the complexity of Southeast Asian cultures through the lens of twentieth and twenty-first century literature, Southeast Asian cinema, and women's writings. Focuses on class, gender, race, and oppression; survey of geographical and historical events and context. Satisfies the Global Perspectives requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Spring semester, odd-numbered years. Taught in English. 3 credits. Fee.

Historical & Political Geography (SHY 106)

An introduction to geographic thought with emphasis on the importance of geographical factors in history and politics. Spring semester. 3 credits. Fee.

3 Credits.

Ancient World (SHY 120)

Introduction to critical thinking and research skills related to historical inquiry through the lens of the study of the ancient past. Study of ancient societies in the Near East and Europe and the major themes and questions related to them, emphasizing the development of social groups, gender expectations and perceptions, early economies, political organization, and all aspects of developing culture. In combination with SHY226, counts toward ancient Western Cultures requirement (SLA200) of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Topics in 20th Century US History (SHY 391)

This course explores a variety of selected topics in American history, from the era of Progressivism to the present day. Students explore topics or time periods in depth, master interpretations of the topic or era, and use primary sources and historical works to carry out guided research. Prerequisite: SHY103 or SLA201. Offered as needed. Repeatable for credit. Satisfies the U.S. Cultures requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. 3 credits.

Topics in Global History (SHY 394)

Focuses on an area of global history that extends beyond the cultural “western world.” This may include regional histories, comparative history, or global history. Prerequisite: SEL106 or SEL107. Satisfies the Global Perspectives requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Spring semester. Repeatable for credit. 3 credits.

Structure of the Number System 1 (SMA 100)

Topics include problem-solving, set theory, number theory, numeration systems, and algebra review. Particular emphasis is placed on the successive development of real numbers and the employment of electronic resources. The first course in a sequence of two mathematics courses designed for students who are pursuing teacher certification in areas other than secondary mathematics. Prerequisite knowledge: This course requires a working knowledge of elementary algebra. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

Structure of the Number System 2 (SMA 102)

Topics include geometry, counting methods, probability, statistics, logic, and consumer mathematics. Particular emphasis is placed on problem-solving strategies and the employment of electronic resources. The second course in a sequence of two mathematics courses designed for students who are pursuing teacher certification in areas other than secondary mathematics. Prerequisite: SMA100. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

College Algebra (SMA 103)

A study of basic algebraic skills and additional algebraic topics including (but not limited to) real numbers, rational numbers, and radicals; systems of linear equations; polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions and equations; and complex numbers. Prerequisite knowledge: This course requires a working knowledge of elementary algebra. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

Make Money Matter (SMA 104)

Through the use of quantitative skills and critical thinking case studies, students develop personal financial competency. Includes financial goals and approaches to spending, saving, protecting, and investing financial resources to use now and in the future. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall and spring semesters. 3 credits.

Contemporary Mathematics (SMA 105)

Designed to address problem-solving methods and modeling through a variety of topics. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisite knowledge: This course requires a working knowledge of elementary algebra. Offered as needed. 3 credits.

Mathematics of Games (SMA 106)

A study of strategies; basic probability, logic, and decision trees; non-random games, random games, and games with incomplete information. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisite knowledge: This course requires a working knowledge of elementary algebra. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Nutrition for Life (SNT 160)

Introductory study of nutrition principles and their relationship to health. Discussion of topics such as vegetarianism, dieting, and eating disorders. Laboratory experiences investigating nutritional content of food and related topics. Satisfies the Science requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall, spring, and summer and ADP Session 1. 3 credits. Fee.

College Physics I (SPH 106)

This course is a trigonometry-based physics course that covers topics in the mechanics of motion. The course covers linear and nonlinear approximations in motion, acceleration, Newton’s law, relativity, gravity, work, circular motion, momentum and fluids, graph analysis, and problem solving skills. Prerequisite: Appropriate level of high school mathematics as determined during advisement. Corequisite: SPH107. Fall semester. 3 credits.

College Physics I Lab (SPH 107)

Laboratory course to complement topics covered in SPH106 weekly (3 hours). Corequisite: SPH106. Fall semester. 1 credit. Fee.

College Physics II (SPH 108)

This trigonometry-based physics course covers topics in electromagnetism from waves to the theory of light matter. Topics include electricity, magnetism, and optics. The student gains a good foundation of the basic principles of graph analysis and problem-solving skills. Corequisite: SPH109. Spring semester. 3 credits.

College Physics II Lab (SPH 109)

Laboratory course to complement topics covered in SPH108 weekly (3 hours). Corequisite: SPH108. Spring semester. 1 credit. Fee.

Introduction to Philosophy (SPL 100)

Surveys philosophical questions in order to experience and reflect on philosophical insight. Preparation for SLA400. Satisfies the Philosophy requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall, spring, and summer. 3 credits.

Mind and Body (SPL 200)

This course explores the philosophical and practical issues of the separation and integration of our concepts of mind and body. Introduction to a non-Western physical/mental discipline and techniques for improved physical health. Course includes an outside physical activity (e.g., tai chi). Satisfies the Philosophy requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits. Fee.

Asian Perspectives (SPL 280)

Explores Asian thought in Vedantic (Hindu), Confucian, Taoist, and Buddhist texts. Satisfies the Global Perspectives requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Introduction to Political Science (SPS 103)

A comprehensive introduction to the study of political science. Key concepts and theories are explored. Emphasis on the development and organization of the modern state; functions, processes, and ideologies of contemporary political systems; and introduction to the subfields of political science. Fall semester. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Genocide and Human Rights (SPS 206)

This course explores human rights as an important international norm that is reflected in policies, practices, and laws at the international and national levels. It addresses such topics as: the use of military force to promote human rights; the development of international criminal courts; humanitarian and human rights law; crimes against humanity; and ethnic cleansing. Satisfies the Global Perspectives requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Infancy,Childhood,Adolescence & Lab (SPY 225)

The study of human physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development from conception through adolescence. Includes observation and analysis of children’s behavior at the campus Child Development Center. Tubercular check, Act 33 Child Abuse, Act 34 Criminal Record check, Act 114 FBI Federal Criminal History Record, and PDE-6004 (Arrest or Conviction Report and Certification Form) required. Fall and spring semesters, and ADP session 4 in even-numbered years. 3 credits.

Introduction to Counseling (SPY 270)

Introduces the skills necessary for effective interviewing and counseling. Various theoretical approaches to counseling. A variety of classroom exercises to promote the student’s ability to listen and respond effectively in helping relationships and in other interpersonal relationships. Fall and spring semesters, and ADP session 3 in odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

Parenting (SPY 355)

Addresses issues of the child/parent relationship and the impact of today's culture on child rearing. Fall semester odd years. 3 credits.

Story of Christianity (SRT 215)

An introduction to Christian history from its roots in Judaism to the dawn of the Reformation. Major themes in theological development. Attention is given to the history of Christian women. Satisfies the Theology requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Spring semester, even-numbered years. 3 credits.

Contemporary Christian Ethics (SRT 260)

A study of the foundations of Christian ethics and an examination of method in moral decision-making. Closer study of selected contemporary moral issues with an emphasis on social ethics. Writing Intensive course. Satisfies the Theology requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Spring semester, even-numbered years. 3 credits.

Jesus (SRT 280)

An understanding of Jesus and of the salvation He brings, grounded in the scriptural accounts of His teaching, actions, death, and resurrection. Theological reflection on the significance of Jesus in relation to contemporary global issues. Satisfies the Theology requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Islam: Religion and Culture (SRT 335)

Consideration of the foundational events and historic development of Islam as a religion and culture. Attention is given to the contemporary Muslim world and dialogue with Western culture. Satisfies the Global Perspectives requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester, even-numbered years. 3 credits.

The Developing World (SRT 340)

An examination of the challenges faced by the marginalized in Africa, Asia, and Latin America associated with colonialism and globalization. The historical context and abiding impact of these phenomena are investigated through seminal thinkers and major texts of postcolonial theory as expressed in cultural studies, continental philosophy, and liberation theology. Case studies and current events facilitate critical yet hopeful applications of theory to the political, economic, and cultural dynamics of the developing world. Satisfies the Global Perspectives requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits. Fee.

Principles of Sociology (SSO 100)

Examines the social and cultural forces that shape the lives of individuals and groups; the socialization of the human person throughout the stages of life; the multiple functions of social groups, institutions, and culture; and introduction to sociological theories. Fall semester and ADP Session 1. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Race, Class, and Gender (SSO 200)

Reviews research on cultural definitions of race, class, and gender and their consequences for social life; institutional stratification and efforts to reduce inequalities; and attempts to revise the meaning of race, class, and gender in American culture. Spring semester and ADP Session 1. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Marriage and Family (SSO 316)

Analysis of the cultural forms, social changes, and human behavior occurring in the American family in transition; study of alternate life styles and relationships. Fall semester in odd-numbered years and ADP Session 2 in even-numbered years. 3 credits.

Law and Society (SSO 385)

Reviews philosophies of law and visions of social justice developed over the course of American history. Considers the role laws have played in promoting and impeding democracy and equality. Focuses on pivotal and controversial laws and cases such as Brown v. Board of Education and Roe v. Wade. Satisfies the U.S. Cultures requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Spring semester, even-numbered years, and ADP session 3, odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

Latin American Lit in Translation (SSP 333)

An introduction to literary trends within Latin American literature available in translation. Readings include theoretical and historical works that lend pertinent contextual information. Taught in English. Satisfies the Global Perspectives requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester, even-numbered years. 3 credits. Fee

Span.Study in Spain & Latin America (SSP 411)

This travel course provides Spanish study abroad and is open to students in J-term or M-term. It develops comprehension and communicative skills within the local culture using conversational approach, daily oral practice, and proficiency-oriented activities in small classrooms and authentic local contexts. J-term or M-term. Repeatable for credit. Variable credit. Satisfies Language Study requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum if taken for 3 credits. Fee.

Introductory Statistics (SSS 250)

Designed to develop quantitative literacy, enabling students to produce, understand, and communicate statistical information. Prepares students to conduct research. Explores descriptive and inferential statistics that include parametric (Z, t, F) and non-parametric (chi-square) probability distributions. Ability to make recommendations based upon interpretation of statistical software output is emphasized. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall and spring semesters and ADP sessions 1, 3, and 4. 3 credits.

3 Credits.

Intro to Profession of Social Work (SSW 150)

Introduction to the development of the social work profession, the current state of the profession, the generalist practice method, and the populations currently served by the profession. Students learn to identify common human needs and recognize some of the internal and external obstacles that interfere with optimal social functioning. A 15-hour service learning component introduces students to various methodologies and fields of social work practice. Fall semester. 3 credits. Fee.

Social Welfare (SSW 210)

An examination of the historical and contemporary social purposes, values, and policies of the institution of social welfare. Considers the social, political, and economic origins and consequences of societal provisions for economic security and social services. Satisfies the U.S. Cultures requirement of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Fall semester. 3 credits.

Human Behavior & Soc. Environment I (SSW 250)

Integrates knowledge obtained from the Liberal Arts Curriculum to understand the biological, psychological, social, and cultural determinants of human behavior for infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. Theories of human development and human behavior are critically examined to determine their applicability to diverse populations. An ecological life model perspective is integrated with systems theory in order to help students recognize the relationship among micro (individual), mezzo (family and group), and macro (organizations, communities, and society) level problems. Pre- or co-requisite: SSW150. Fall semester. 3 credits.

The Helping Relationship (SSW 271)

Introduces students to the social work skills of effective communication and engagement in working with individuals, families, groups, and organizations in a variety of helping situations. Fall semester, and ADP session 4, odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

View courses and full requirements for this program in the current course catalog.

View Course Catalog