Borrowing

All currently enrolled SHU students, faculty, staff, administration, Sisters of Charity, alumni, affiliates of other area colleges, and non-affiliated members of the community may borrow items from Reeves Library. See details below.

SHU Students


Students currently enrolled for classes may borrow an unlimited number of books for a period of three weeks, and up to five videos for a period of four days. During the summer, students who have enrolled for the fall semester also have borrowing privileges. Items may be renewed two times. Borrowers must display a valid SHU ID card in order to borrow materials.

Faculty, Staff, Administration 


Faculty, staff, and administration may borrow an unlimited number of books for a period of one semester, and up to five videos for a period of four days. Items may be renewed twice. All borrowers must display a valid SHU ID card in order to borrow materials.

SHU Alumni 


Alumni may apply for a free alumni library card in order to borrow materials. Alumni may borrow a total of five items. Books circulate for three weeks while videos circulate for four days. Items may be renewed once.

Students/Faculty at Area Colleges


Students from St. Vincent College, the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, and Westmoreland County Community College who are currently enrolled for classes may borrow an unlimited number of books for a period of three weeks, and up to five videos for a period of four days. These items may be renewed once. Faculty members from the above institutions may borrow an unlimited number of books for a period of one semester, and up to five videos for a period of four days. Faculty may renew items once. Both groups of borrowers (students and faculty) must display a current validated ID card from their home institution in order to borrow materials. 
(Note: SHU students & faculty also have borrowing privileges at these institutions.) 

Non-Affiliated Community Members 

Members of the community may receive a library card for a $25.00 annual fee. Community members may borrow a total of five items. Books circulate for three weeks while videos circulate for four days. Items may be renewed once.

Fines & Fees

All students (SHU and non-SHU), alumni, and paying customers are subject to late fees for overdue materials. The fine schedule is as follows: 

  • Books, CDs, CD-ROMs, musical scores, filmstrips, and slides: 25 cents per day following the date due. The maximum fine is $25.00 per item.
  • Videocassettes & DVDs: $1.00 per day following the date due. The maximum fine is $50.00 per item.
  • Reserves: $1.00 per hour for two-hour reserve items. $10.00 per day per overnight reserve item.
  • Lost Item Replacement Fee: Once an item is 60 days overdue it is considered lost. A lost item fee of $15.00 will be added to the borrower's library account. The borrower will be responsible for all overdue fines that have accrued, the $15.00 lost item fee, and the replacement cost of the item.
  • Suspension of borrowing privileges: Students are permitted to carry a balance of $10.00 before borrowing privileges are suspended. 

Fair Use Guidelines

Overview

One of the rights accorded to the owner of copyright is the right to reproduce or to authorize others to reproduce the work in copies or recordings. This right is subject to certain limitations found in sections 107 through 118 of the copyright act (title 17, U.S. Code). One of the more important limitations is the doctrine of “fair use.” Although fair use was not mentioned in the previous copyright law, the doctrine has developed through a substantial number of court decisions over the years. This doctrine has been codified in section 107 of the copyright law.

Section 107, Fair Use, "Four Factors"

Section 107 contains a list of the various purposes for which the reproduction of a particular work may be considered “fair,” such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Section 107 also sets out four factors to be considered in determining whether or not a particular use is fair:

  • the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes;
  • the nature of the copyrighted work (is it factual or highly creative?);
  • amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole (generally, one chapter from a book or a single article from a magazine or journal issue);
  • effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.

The distinction between “fair use” and infringement may be unclear and not easily defined. There is no specific number of words, lines, or notes that may safely be taken without permission. Acknowledging the source of the copyrighted material does not substitute for obtaining permission.

The 1961 Report of the Register of Copyrights on the General Revision of the U.S. Copyright Law cites examples of activities that courts have regarded as fair use: “quotation of excerpts in a review or criticism for purposes of illustration or comment; quotation of short passages in a scholarly or technical work, for illustration or clarification of the author's observations; use in a parody of some of the content of the work parodied; summary of an address or article, with brief quotations, in a news report; reproduction by a library of a portion of a work to replace part of a damaged copy; reproduction by a teacher or student of a small part of a work to illustrate a lesson; reproduction of a work in legislative or judicial proceedings or reports; incidental and fortuitous reproduction, in a newsreel or broadcast, of a work located in the scene of an event being reported.”

Copyright protects the particular way an author has expressed him or herself; it does not extend to any ideas, systems, or factual information conveyed in the work.

The safest course is always to get permission from the copyright owner before using copyrighted material. The Copyright Office cannot give this permission.

When it is impracticable to obtain permission, use of copyrighted material should be avoided unless the doctrine of “fair use” would clearly apply to the situation.

Obtaining Permission to Use Copyrighted Materials

If a faculty member wishes to use articles, sections or books, etc., as reserve items for more than one semester s/he is responsible for obtaining copyright permission to do so. Proof of permission must be furnished upon request.

For information on requesting copyright permission visit the Copyright Clearance Center at copyright.com, email info@copyright.com, or phone (978) 750-8400.

Gifts

Guidelines for gifts/donations to Reeves Memorial Library:

  • Potential donors should provide a list of materials being offered, prior to sending a gift.
  • Donors are responsible for the delivery of the gift.
  • Gift materials will be evaluated using the same standards that are applied in selecting new materials.
  • Donations to the collection must be able to be integrated without the need for special facilities, control, handling, or staffing unless the cost is contained as part of the gift.
  • The library is not able to accept duplicates of materials already in the collection, unless the library copy is in a condition that warrants replacement.
  • Periodicals will not be accepted. 
  • The IRS requires that the donor be responsible for gift appraisals. By law, the library is not allowed to be responsible for the appraisal of gifts.
  • The library has the right to retain or dispose of any gift according to library policy. 
  • All departments of Seton Hill University must adhere to this policy in accepting potential donations for the library. 
  • The library reserves the right to refuse unsolicited gifts that do not comply with this policy.

Interlibrary Loans

In providing service to students, faculty and staff of Seton Hill University, it is in the interest of all concerned to maximize users' access to many different types of material as quickly and economically as possible. Interlibrary loan (ILL) is one way by which Reeves Library can achieve this. 

  • Materials: Books and journal articles. All borrowed material is subject to recall.
  • Availability: Requests are processed as they are received.
  • Time Periods: Forms must be completed properly. Most requests will be sent within one to two days of submission. Borrowers are expected to adhere to policies, guidelines and deadlines set by lending libraries. ILL books cannot be renewed.
  • Fines: $1.00 per day will be charged for late returns. No ILL requests will be processed if a patron has outstanding ILL or library fines. Borrowers are also responsible for any late charges levied by a lending institution as well as those levied by Seton Hill.
  • Lost Items: If a patron from SHU loses an ILL book, he/she must relinquish all ILL borrowing privileges until the item is returned or the lending library is appropriately reimbursed. Patrons are responsible for any ILL materials they use.
  • Copyright: Compliance with copyright laws is expected.
  • Staff: The Public Services Librarian oversees the ILL process.

Information Fluency

Seton Hill University defines information fluent students as those who, upon graduation, will possess the ability to combine all forms of literacy in order to master a chosen topic. Students who develop information fluency skills will successfully:

  • Critically analyze appropriate topics.
  • Conceptualize the parameters of the topic.
  • Locate and access relevant information in all forms.
  • Competently evaluate information.
  • Understand practical, legal and social issues related to the information.
  • Interact with faculty and staff in a manner evident of the development of superior research skills.
  • Synthesize diverse types of information into a comprehensive and coherent work.

Reeves Memorial Library is located on Seton Hill's hilltop campus (Look for number 12 on this map). Questions? Give us a call at (724) 838-4291, or contact a specific member of our staff directly.